Grammar Rules

To do vs. Doing – Infinitive or Gerund The doctor advised him to avoid eating fatty foods.                           ↓                   ↓          ↓              ...
Every = all members of a group considered individually All = the total number of people or things considered as a group Each = all members of a group considered individually though we think of them more one by one.   Every, All, Each – Difference 'Every' and 'all' have similar meanings. We use them...
Going by grammar rules, there is only one way to use this word, and that is nowadays – a single word and not as three different entities like now a days. If you use the word as a phrase ‘now a days’ instead of a single word ‘nowadays’, you will...
Prefer: If you prefer one person or thing to another, you like the first one better.   My sister prefers dogs to cats.                 √               My sister prefers dogs over cats.              √             My sister prefers dogs than cats.              ✗ My sister prefers dogs rather than cats.              √          I prefer to drink...
Around the world = around the world (or globe); all over the world; everywhere in the world (or globe); in many parts of the world; in a large proportion of Earth; in various parts of Earth; around Earth from east to west, or west to east, thus crossing all...
Arouse (int.v.) = The verb arouse means 1- to awaken from sleep; to stimulate to action or to bodily readiness for activity; 2- to excite: a newspaper report that has aroused debate; 3- to excite (someone) sexually: to cause sexual arousal in (someone). Examples: He was aroused from a deep sleep...
Misinformation = the false information which is intended to mislead; incorrect or misleading information. Disinformation = false information, deliberately misleading or biased information; manipulated narrative or facts; propaganda. Disinformation is knowingly spreading misinformation. Information which is spread to make someone or something look good or bad can be disinformation.   Examples: There's...
When we deal with two pronouns at the same time in a statement, we use both pronouns either in subjective or objective case: ‘He and I arranged the party’; ‘if you don’t want to go alone, you can take either her or me along’, ‘she and I are schoolmates.’ He...
As a quantifier, ‘too much’ means ‘an excess of’ needing a noun group; it simply denotes overfull, and will only quantify volumes (i.e. too much coffee, too much rain) whereas ‘much too’ is a secondary modifier, of an adjective or adverb and it means strong by a large margin;...
When we talk about comparisons, we normally use the expressions ‘the same…as’ and ‘the same…that’. Both expressions mean almost the same – very alike in appearance, behaviour, traits, characteristics, etc., as someone or something else. If something is happening the same as something else, the two things are happening...

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