Grammar Rules

Going by grammar rules, there is only one way to use this word, and that is nowadays – a single word and not as three different entities like now a days. If you use the word as a phrase ‘now a days’ instead of a single word ‘nowadays’, you will...
Prefer: If you prefer one person or thing to another, you like the first one better.   My sister prefers dogs to cats.                 √               My sister prefers dogs over cats.              √             My sister prefers dogs than cats.              ✗ My sister prefers dogs rather than cats.              √          I prefer to drink...
Around the world = around the world (or globe); all over the world; everywhere in the world (or globe); in many parts of the world; in a large proportion of Earth; in various parts of Earth; around Earth from east to west, or west to east, thus crossing all...
Arouse (int.v.) = The verb arouse means 1- to awaken from sleep; to stimulate to action or to bodily readiness for activity; 2- to excite: a newspaper report that has aroused debate; 3- to excite (someone) sexually: to cause sexual arousal in (someone). Examples: He was aroused from a deep sleep...
Misinformation = the false information which is intended to mislead; incorrect or misleading information. Disinformation = false information, deliberately misleading or biased information; manipulated narrative or facts; propaganda. Disinformation is knowingly spreading misinformation. Information which is spread to make someone or something look good or bad can be disinformation.   Examples: There's...
When we deal with two pronouns at the same time in a statement, we use both pronouns either in subjective or objective case: ‘He and I arranged the party’; ‘if you don’t want to go alone, you can take either her or me along’, ‘she and I are schoolmates.’ He...
As a quantifier, ‘too much’ means ‘an excess of’ needing a noun group; it simply denotes overfull, and will only quantify volumes (i.e. too much coffee, too much rain) whereas ‘much too’ is a secondary modifier, of an adjective or adverb and it means strong by a large margin;...
When we talk about comparisons, we normally use the expressions ‘the same…as’ and ‘the same…that’. Both expressions mean almost the same – very alike in appearance, behaviour, traits, characteristics, etc., as someone or something else. If something is happening the same as something else, the two things are happening...
We use still and Yet as adverbs to talk about things that have (or haven’t) happened over time. Though their meanings and uses are obvious, there are many situations in which they are used interchangeably to convey a similar idea: She says she doesn't like her boss, still/ yet she won't stop working for...
Be supposed to meaning ‘to be expected to’ or ‘to be required to’ is a common phrase that functions the same way as a modal verb does. The modal verbs also known as auxiliary or helping verbs express ability, possibility, permission, or obligation: ‘I have to be home before midnight or my father will be mad...

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