Grammar Rules

Wake and awake; waken and awaken are perhaps the most vexing words that confuse most writers and speakers. All these four have almost similar meaning, though some are used in the way others cannot be. Now let’s start with each of them:   Wake = Emerge or cause to emerge from...
Each of + determiner + plural noun = Each can be followed by a determiner (A, an, the, my, his, etc.) and a plural noun; refers to only one of a set or collection; or to a set or collection among others; hence, each takes a singular verb (‘is’)...
Majority = Can be either singular or plural; however, it all depends on the context. If we use the word ‘majority’ to describe a collection of individuals, we treat it as plural: Although the majority likes his suggestions in general, it doesn’t agree with him on every issue. (In British English,...
Be concerned about sth/sb = Used after a linking verb such as be; If you are concerned about something, you are worried about it.   Be concerned with sth/sb = To be related to a particular thing or person; if a piece of information, statement or speech is concerned with a subject, it deals with it.   Grandma has been concerned about Jack lately. The Prime Minister was concerned about the level of corruption in the country. Mr Harry has always been concerned about the welfare of...
In spite of = Regardless of; without being affected or prevented by something mentioned; despite Despite    = Regardless of; in defiance of We use in spite of when we mention some fact that makes another fact surprising.   Notice that it is in spite of (spelling-wise), and not 'inspite of.   In spite of her injury, Martina will play in Sunday's match.               In spite of his best efforts, he couldn’t save...
Who, that and which are all relative pronouns which are used in a sentence or clause to specify which person or thing or which type of person or thing we are talking about.   Who vs. that   In a defining relative clause, the relative pronoun can be the subject or the object of the clause....
Learnt = Much more common in British English than in American English Learned = Used in both British English and American English   We learnt/learned of President’s death on BBC radio. Jill learnt/learned the table of 11 by heart. Though she was driven to distraction by the noisy niblings, she  learnt/learned the speech in a few hours. She learnt/learned Spanish from her mother. She hasn’t...
On your own =  Without any help; unaccompanied by others; alone By yourself    =  Through one's own efforts; alone; nobody else On your own and by yourself are two phrases that are seemingly different, but their meanings are the same and often both are used interchangeably with no loss of meaning....
Insist on doing something (v.intr.) = To be resolute or firm in a demand or course: He insisted on paying for his share of the expenses. Insist that (v.tr.) = To assert or demand (something) firmly or persistently; and often that something is true, especially when other people think it may not be true: He insisted that he’d pay for...
Different from = Standard phrase, the most common of the three; used in simple comparisons both in US and UK English   There’s not much difference in sense between the three expressions, and all of these have been used by eminent writers. What actually happened was totally different from what the police...

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