Grammar Rules

So vs. So that

So = The intensive so means ‘very or extremely’ (The teachers’ attitude is so casual these days) occurs chiefly in informal speech. We use so in place of so that even in formal writing; hence, the matter is stylistic preference. So that = To the amount or degree expressed or...
When we use but as except, we use object pronouns after but (you, her, me, us, etc.) even in subject position: No one but her had well prepared for the dance. In formal situations, we can use subject pronouns after but: Everyone but he knew how the events were going to...
If I were you = Refers to a hypothetical situation in the present or the future (subjunctive) and doesn’t refer to the past; it is a condition which is contrary to the fact, that is, I am NOT you: If I were you, I would call the police.   Notice that the...
As well as = means ‘and in addition’; ‘and also’; ‘too’; used when we want to refer another item connected with the subject we are talking about; as well as is the conjunction which is frequently misused in most academic texts. Two major errors are generally made in its...
None of = Used before the demonstratives (this, that), possessives (his, your, my) or pronouns; None of his colleagues doubt that he is a man of the highest integrity.   A traditional rule of usage says that none must always be used as singular; however, it has been used with both singular...
There are four types of conditional sentences: Zero Conditional Sentences i) refer to general truths such as scientific or natural facts; ii) in this type of condition sentences, the time is now or always and the situation is real or possible; iii) if-clause (Simple present) + Main clause (Simple present); iv) use a...
Both ‘in the street’ and ‘on the street’ are correct, according to the contexts. However, ‘at the street’ has somewhat different story. I am in the street = Refers to the person being in an enclosed space surrounded by buildings, shops; in the street (in the middle of the traffic...
Any of = Used before a plural noun phrase beginning with the, these, those, or a possessive to express an individual thing or person belonging to a particular group. Any of + the pronouns (this, that, these, those, it, us, you, or them) + countable noun takes either a...
Seem + to be + adjective or Seem + adjective   Seem = Gives a certain impression or have a certain outward aspect; the impression of being true, probable, or apparent; Seem is often followed by to be + an adjective: He seems (to be) a perfect gentleman. He has an authoritative manner...
Seem = Suggests how something looks or seems to look; used to describe a perceived condition; also suggests that something is true when we are not certain or when we want to be polite.   Appear = Used to talk about facts and events describing an observable condition; denotes that the...

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