Grammar Rules

Too + adj…infinitive = We use too as an intensifier that expresses that something is deficient and less than what is desirable or extra or more than what is desirable. This expression is supplemented by an infinitive (nonfinite infinitive clause):   Mrs. Joseph is too ill to need a doctor.  (The...

Both … and

We use the correlative conjunctions both ... and to emphasise two coordinated elements in a sentence. Subjects joined with both … and take the plural conjugation. Both ... and makes a stronger connection in comparison with ‘and’ alone. We can use the pair both ... and as objects of verbs, however, we...
Between … and ... = In or through the space that separates two things, places, or people Between ... to ... = Ungrammatical   He held the stone between his thumb and forefinger.    The agreement has been signed between US and Japan.                                                    Sitting between Pamela and me was my small Cooper.    Dr. Harvard is...
The reason why... that = We use the reason why before a clause The reason why...because = Ungrammatical; do not use why and because in a single sentence. The reason why is accompanied by the 'result' of the situation: The reason why we couldn't attend Barbara’s party was that it was raining...
We use the expression it’s (high) time + subject + past verb form to say that something is already late and it should be done now. It’s high time = It’s high time you got those shoes mended. The heel will fall off. It’s time = It’s time you got those shoes mended....

When vs. While

Both when and while are used for action; however, there is quite a bit difference between them. When = To introduce a single completed event that happens in the middle of a longer event: When the gardener was playing piano, Nancy plucked the flowers. She threw empty bottles on the street When...

Who vs. Whom

Who = Used in the subject position in a sentence, so it’s the doer of an action Whom = Used in the object position when who is not the subject of its own clause   Who and whom are also used as relative pronouns; used to link one clause to another The man...

So vs. So that

So = The intensive so means ‘very or extremely’ (The teachers’ attitude is so casual these days) occurs chiefly in informal speech. We use so in place of so that even in formal writing; hence, the matter is stylistic preference. So that = To the amount or degree expressed or...
When we use but as except, we use object pronouns after but (you, her, me, us, etc.) even in subject position: No one but her had well prepared for the dance. In formal situations, we can use subject pronouns after but: Everyone but he knew how the events were going to...
If I were you = Refers to a hypothetical situation in the present or the future (subjunctive) and doesn’t refer to the past; it is a condition which is contrary to the fact, that is, I am NOT you: If I were you, I would call the police.   Notice that the...

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