Grammar Rules

Both ‘in the street’ and ‘on the street’ are correct, according to the contexts. However, ‘at the street’ has somewhat different story. I am in the street = Refers to the person being in an enclosed space surrounded by buildings, shops; in the street (in the middle of the traffic...
Any of = Used before a plural noun phrase beginning with the, these, those, or a possessive to express an individual thing or person belonging to a particular group. Any of + the pronouns (this, that, these, those, it, us, you, or them) + countable noun takes either a...
Seem + to be + adjective or Seem + adjective   Seem = Gives a certain impression or have a certain outward aspect; the impression of being true, probable, or apparent; Seem is often followed by to be + an adjective: He seems (to be) a perfect gentleman. He has an authoritative manner...
Seem = Suggests how something looks or seems to look; used to describe a perceived condition; also suggests that something is true when we are not certain or when we want to be polite.   Appear = Used to talk about facts and events describing an observable condition; denotes that the...

Unreal Past

Wish + (that) + past simple We often use past tense to refer to an unreal situation. Though the tense is in the past, we, in fact, talk about some hypothetical situation – something that didn’t happen: a state or situation in the present that we regret but do...
As if = Used to express that something is unlikely and should not be considered As though = The same as 'as if' The difference between 'as if' and 'as though' is subtle and both of them can be used interchangeably. However, ‘as if’ is more common than ‘as though’: She acts...

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