Grammar Rules

Who, that and which are all relative pronouns which are used in a sentence or clause to specify which person or thing or which type of person or thing we are talking about.   Who vs. that   In a defining relative clause, the relative pronoun can be the subject or the object of the clause....
Learnt = Much more common in British English than in American English Learned = Used in both British English and American English   We learnt/learned of President’s death on BBC radio. Jill learnt/learned the table of 11 by heart. Though she was driven to distraction by the noisy niblings, she  learnt/learned the speech in a few hours. She learnt/learned Spanish from her mother. She hasn’t...
On your own =  Without any help; unaccompanied by others; alone By yourself    =  Through one's own efforts; alone; nobody else On your own and by yourself are two phrases that are seemingly different, but their meanings are the same and often both are used interchangeably with no loss of meaning....
Insist on doing something (v.intr.) = To be resolute or firm in a demand or course: He insisted on paying for his share of the expenses. Insist that (v.tr.) = To assert or demand (something) firmly or persistently; and often that something is true, especially when other people think it may not be true: He insisted that he’d pay for...
Different from = Standard phrase, the most common of the three; used in simple comparisons both in US and UK English   There’s not much difference in sense between the three expressions, and all of these have been used by eminent writers. What actually happened was totally different from what the police...

Food vs. Foods

Food is a non-countable noun when it means food in general (less food not fewer food); we don’t say one food or two foods. It is both singular and plural depending on the context of the statement, so foods is acceptable. (Many snack foods aren't good for your health)....
Convert to = Change from one form to another; to a new religion, belief, opinion Convert into = Change the nature, purpose, or function of something   After marriage, Sara made Adam convert to vegetarianism. When she was a baby, she was raised by a priest and then converted to Catholicism. Lara is a new convert to Christianity. Jack always...
Normally, we write master’s degree, with the apostrophe. Here, the s in master’s shows a possessive (the degree of a master), not a plural. However, when we talk of a degree in a specific field, like the Science or Arts, we drop the apostrophe and the s. Instead, capitalize both...
Whether we treat the US as singular or plural, it depends on what we want to say about it. For example, if we’re treating the United States as the country, the singular form is OK: The United States is a federal republic consisting of 50 states.   On the other hand,...
As all these words denote the same meaning in the English language, don’t use any two words together in a sentence: Suppose if the doctor operated on him in time, his life would be saved.     ✗   Supposing = Used at the beginning of a sentence or clause to denote 'what...

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